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Questions

I love when people ask questions as it offers a chance to learn, reflect, and grow. Here are some of the questions I’ve been asked over the years. Do you have any questions for me? Feel free to connect; I’d love to hear from you!

 

 

Q. “What makes Yoga different from other forms of exercise?”

Yoga works on the mind as well as the body. In addition to increasing stamina and flexibility, by practicing specific exercises with awareness and intention, Yoga can establish a sense of calmness and inner peace.  “When the mind is silent, the heart talks. The language of the heart is love, compassion and peace. One who has silenced the mind has attained inner peace.” ~Baba Hari Dass

Q. “You end your class with the word “namaste”. What does it mean?

The word Namaste is an ancient Sanskrit term which means “I bow to you”.  On a deeper level, Namaste means: “the spirit in me recognizes and bows to the spirit in you, which is the same spirit.”  An amplified translation, which does a beautiful job transmitting the meaning of the popular term through to the reader, is the translation I prefer to share:

I honor the place in you in which the entire
 universe dwells. I honor the place in you which
is of love, of truth, of light and of peace.
When you are in that place in you
and I am in that place in me,
we are one.
Q. “I am not very flexible. Can I still do Yoga?”
Absolutely! At its heart, Yoga is an internal practice. We are using methods to still the mind; to replace unhelpful habits with newer, healthier habits. While a good deal of the practices are physical movements and postures, it’s not how far one bends that matters. We’ll focus on proper alignment, being kind to our bodies and honoring where we are at. When something changes and you can safely move a little deeper, do so… but only when your body is ready. Peace!
Q.  Is Yoga a religion?”
Quoting my main teacher, Baba Hari Dass from his book Everyday Peace: “Yoga is not a religion. It’s a science to attain peace, enlightenment, and liberation. Any person of any faith or religion can practice Yoga.” (p 73)